Senate debates

Monday, 19 June 2017

Questions without Notice

Carbon Pricing

2:35 pm

Photo of Simon BirminghamSimon Birmingham (SA, Liberal Party, Minister for Education and Training) Share this | Hansard source

I am not a walking index to the pages and contents of the Finkel report, so I will happily take on notice the aspect of the question that seeks a particular page reference. But the senator did mention the impact of electricity price rises over the period of 2007 to 2016. Of course, there have been many factors there in terms of the retail charges, the wholesale charges and the distribution charges that, at different junctures, have had an impact. The Finkel report does demonstrate that, at present, in terms of some of the price pressures, the generation charges, and particularly the contribution of the peaking of gas prices, is a real factor that the Turnbull government is taking very seriously and working to address.

Equally, if you look at the trajectory of price rises, you can see that, in that time horizon, there was one period where prices, in fact, did dip somewhat. That was the period after the coalition government came to power, took out a carbon tax and put in place other measures to meet our emissions reduction targets—measures that are proving to be successful and reduced the impact of price rises. (Time expired)

Comments

Tibor Majlath
Posted on 20 Jun 2017 5:05 pm (Report this comment)

On electricity price rises the senator surprises by stating that "there have been many factors there in terms of the retail charges, the wholesale charges and the distribution charges that, at different junctures, have had an impact."

I thought Labor was totally responsible.

But of course, the Senator saw a dip in prices when the carbon tax was abolished which generally went unnoticed by consumers as prices continued to rise because of those other charges post carbon tax.

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