This data was produced by OpenAustralia from a variety of sources.

Bob McMullan, former Representative, former Senator

Photo of Bob McMullan
  • Former Australian Labor Party Representative for Fraser
  • Former Australian Labor Party Senator for ACT
  • Entered the Senate on 16 February 1988 — unknown
  • Previously Representative for Fraser until 21 August 2010 — retired
  • Entered House of Representatives on 2 March 1996 — Federal election
  • Left Senate on 6 February 1996 — Resigned

Voting record (from They Vote For You)

How Bob McMullan voted on key issues since 2006:

  • Voted very strongly for same sex marriage. votes
  • Voted very strongly against government administered paid parental leave. votes
  • Voted strongly for the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. votes
  • Voted very strongly for increasing competition in bulk wheat export. votes
  • Voted very strongly against voluntary student union fees. votes
  • Voted very strongly for increasing or removing the debt limit. votes
  • Voted very strongly against regional processing of asylum seekers. votes
  • Voted very strongly for restricting foreign ownership. votes
  • Voted strongly for increasing investment in renewable energy. votes
  • Voted very strongly against privatising government assets. votes
  • Voted very strongly for stem cell research. votes
  • Voted very strongly against more scrutiny of intelligence services & police. votes
  • Voted moderately for increasing Aboriginal land rights. votes
  • Voted very strongly for decreasing the private health insurance rebate. votes
  • Voted very strongly against increasing the age pension. votes
  • Voted very strongly for extending government benefits to same-sex couples. votes
  • Voted very strongly for increasing availability of abortion drugs. votes
  • Has never voted on the Intervention in the Northern Territory. votes
  • Voted very strongly against encouraging Australian-based industry. votes
  • Voted moderately for increasing consumer protections. votes

Read about how the voting record is decided.

Most recent appearances in parliament

Autonomous Sanctions Bill 2010: Second Reading (24 Jun 2010)

“I thank the opposition for their support for this measure and I thank the shadow minister for foreign affairs for that contribution. As she was saying, the Autonomous Sanctions Bill 2010, which I of course rise to support, is to support what has been and remains an important facet of diplomacy—not just for Australia, but it has been substantially used by Australia in recent...”

Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Amendment Bill 2010: Second Reading (23 Jun 2010)

“On behalf of the minister responsible for superannuation, I thank the members for Cowper, Robertson and Oxley, who contributed to this debate, for their support for the bill. The Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Amendment Bill 2010 introduces amendments to the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993 to reduce the risks for superannuation funds investing in limited recourse...”

Australian Civilian Corps Bill 2010: Second Reading (23 Jun 2010)

“I move: That this bill be now read a second time. Mr Deputy Speaker, I hope you will allow me a brief indulgence to say that moving the second reading of the Australian Civilian Corps Bill 2010 gives me an opportunity that is not exactly unique but very rare. I do not think that anybody since John Gorton has had the chance to have introduced, on behalf of the government, a bill in each House...”

More of Bob McMullan's recent appearances

Numbers

Please note that numbers do not measure quality. Also, Representatives may do other things not currently covered by this site. (More about this)

  • Has spoken in 20 debates in the last year — well below average amongst Representatives.
  • People have made 0 comments on this Representative's speeches — average amongst Representatives.
  • This Representative's speeches are understandable to an average 17–18 year old, going by the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level score.
  • 24 people are tracking whenever this Representative speaks.
  • Has used three-word alliterative phrases (e.g. "she sells seashells") 111 times in debates — below average amongst Representatives. (Why is this here?)